How many of you ACTUALLY overland with your 80s or 60s

plainjaneFJC

Deplorable
Been too busy to do any real traveling this year with my 60...mainly Club meetings and the occasional run down the mountain for stuff. One of my main concerns over the last couple of years has been the theft of these old trucks in the Denver/Front Range area of Colorado. View attachment 797593
Not sure how many miles a year you put on yours- a declared value policy is something to consider for a nice cruiser as regular insurance doesn’t properly value them IMO.
 

LexusAllTerrain

Expedition Leader
From Baja to Copper Canyon. From Alpine Loop to Utah. From Padre Island to San Diego and in between, and from El Paso to Puerto Vallarta Mexico. and now she is only my QUEEN! I keep on upgrading and doing pre-maintance to have her Displayed on weekends! She was ALWAYS ready and is STILL ready to go at anytime. I am the one that needs to be convince to Overland!
 

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Wc203

Active member
From Baja to Copper Canyon. From Alpine Loop to Utah. From Padre Island to San Diego and in between, and from El Paso to Puerto Vallarta Mexico. and now she is only my QUEEN! I keep on upgrading and doing pre-maintance to have her Displayed on weekends! She was ALWAYS ready and is STILL ready to go at anytime. I am the one that needs to be convince to Overland!
I dig that color ! That thing looks super clean !
 

MOAK

Adventurer
Campers are an option - it does seem like many of the Aus guys are doing the pickup thing w/Trayback. But there are number of shells like the commercial toppers that can be made dust proof and are very secure, some with barn doors.

You lost me at e350 and Farmall engine....
Wow, I’ve been gone for a While - E350 is a ford van. Preferably one kitted out and converted to Solid Axle 4wd. The Farmall is a tractor that was built by International Harvestor in 1924 ( IH ) they also built trucks of all sizes and still build big trucks today. The Ford F series pickup trucks and E series vans used the International ( IH ) diesel engines, which are not very reliable after 150,000 miles or so. If those engines have been rebuilt with the proper upgrades, they will easily go a half million miles more.
 

nickw

Adventurer
Wow, I’ve been gone for a While - E350 is a ford van. Preferably one kitted out and converted to Solid Axle 4wd. The Farmall is a tractor that was built by International Harvestor in 1924 ( IH ) they also built trucks of all sizes and still build big trucks today. The Ford F series pickup trucks and E series vans used the International ( IH ) diesel engines, which are not very reliable after 150,000 miles or so. If those engines have been rebuilt with the proper upgrades, they will easily go a half million miles more.
I know what an E350 but didn't make the connection with "Farmall" but am familiar with IH....
 

David*BJ70

Looking forward to reach the end of the world
Before buying my HDJ100 5 yrs ago, my expedition vehicle was my 60 series equipped with a 12HT. I covered some 50K km, including James Bay, Outer Bank (2x), the Newfoundland-Labrador loop, as well as several expeditions in the forests of Quebec. It's now my summer DD and still serves me well for small-scale excursions pulling my M101 CDN trailer. I just love it!VZGB9975.JPGIMG_0801.JPG2017-08-10 Expédition Baie-James 025.JPG
 

jgallo1

Adventurer
I am a little late to this thread.
For me, you can't beat the feeling of driving an older LC. I think they make great adventure rigs and coffee machines. I drive my 80 as much as I can. If I could tow horses with it I would drive it more. I have had a 60,62, and a 80. My favorite is the 62.
Here is what I can say about the LC's. When I am not working on the ranch's. I love to surf. When I get breaks, I head down to Central America. Coastal Central America eats cars, the climate, the roads, and the animals. It's wild how fast stuff rots down there, If you talk to locals or long-time expats the best vehicles are older LC's.
That's a solid vote of confidence for a vehicle IMO.
 

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
I've taken my FJ60 on several trips. Articles that have been published of my trips are in the link.
The ultimate trip was was when my wife and I drove to Deadhorse, AK and then to Tuk Northwest territories, Canada.

Let me know what you think.




AP1GczPu5fRwMw9Y-9mzxvpkYsD8NBt8r_0MzNqxjNw3c_VbPeR_WrilLpT8_MyKuYP-OBeDhwrRBvS_elliQvVhIcThGNYDIB1ARniR3cIp5B2C522tGK3Mu4Jv-0kkKwL5XEViGxTVcQ3DRPZmEptPP9wyZptJd4sDE37eeXP2X-_uHaS73f5cp_SN1PjgTF8JonqDOMRc6KpqutcRWcVieJqB4UkAekSH9C84auctMjBL8_o_eEAO3J2STM9eZUGrroWnf2-s-N5mHerMu3_WkXo05_9y_6AhKq2N5MuN715QRva_iTukVUil6vc8P2TNgsBuVJTd0vr0S5tVR7zJ6Oo1lNB0HV1qT8vwIn6Srq01nTeQRdNR-axjjVC7ImXx2viYglxfRc8LChKnzQ1OEnb7RFnBr9g3d63jTDOgLDqEfhxdZVyJSwAx3g78IZym858rwaJyAcIxwC424zW8NV2oYLOFXlerDRJCLQkC-2dmHrJgQflTw-xPD1uXMcGUEdaiMpRVknxPL9B6FO--BsitTooNmKtRCWQefj1m5uFubWhLE2hltmtfuRhBFEivax5_8oobFHA9mqe31kVU5Dt8K3jA8OEMkVTvQOyeNc82weC_OCygsHtMtFX9SpfUgsXbMuS9GLC-xqmq6d6R_o9-uYfdJpqkiLmrO02tobK63PVfbeGw0N7lagOyW8gwDT6b0Cae4HO1fh5mNe0t2r-FmP4bDGG2by6fBFJ5VBbnub67gcfNV2EsMjCjn34LfVVJjdcFyAi__u7i-TkYIGJyee15V8pwxf37oiFOHTT64I3Wu_q6rgirZ0YF1Up3cVk9mthhV3h_INhPKzCIW7WWlpO1OP9YoW9A3m6J8H3SwSdAMtmwMsTIqaHEWeZ6H0GSgsPX8DPFz2AhrO_uctzNlA=w1118-h839-s-no-gm
 
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Ikarus

Observer
Haven't read through the entire thread so I may just be beating a dead horse.. but yeah definitely

I'm not really "overlanding" I guess but between my 200, my Tundra and my 80, I always pick the 80 for multi day offroad trips mainly around the western US.

When it's 600 miles of pavement, Tundra all day (gotta love a 38 gallon tank.) When it's 100 miles of pavement and 50 miles offroad with the family, 200. If it's 100 miles of pavement and 500 miles offroad, 80.

It's an acquired taste for sure but if you do all the mechanical work yourself and really know the ins and outs of an old cruiser, it's easier in my mind to venture out into the wilderness. Years ago when I was too busy and subbed out my mechanical work, my modern trucks were something of a black box. I understood basics but I probably would have been in trouble in the middle of nowhere if something broke. Now with an older cruiser it forced me out of my comfort zone and I have done 100% of the work on my 80 (and 200 and Tundra for that matter) since I bought it. I haven't used a mechanic in 5 years. Probably too much of a commitment for some people.

As far as the reliability, I've experienced very few failures. A broken bolt here and there, 25+ year old parts breaking or almost breaking. But I figure if I replace the parts with OEM, I've got another 25 years to go.

The 80 is so simply designed for the most part, and easier to work on than newer vehicles. I think you get durability and reliability with a trade off in safety and creature comforts. Do I wonder if I should be in a more modern vehicle sometimes when driving down rural 2 lane highways with 60 mph speed limits? Yeah, probably. But at least I have airbags. haha. 27 year old airbags.

Anyway having said all that, this is going to be a very difficult vehicle to replace if and when that time comes. They just don't make many body on frame solid axle diesel 4x4s anymore. I'll just keep importing 25 year old rigs... 105 next, then a 76 Series, then a 79 Series Double Cab...

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Andrew Bluemel

New member
I bought my 80 when I was 14. The descion was easy for me. My dad has a 1979 Land Cruiser he bought brand new back in the day. Exploring the Colorado Rockies with him, I knew I needed a Land Cruiser. I had my heart stuck on the FJ60, but my moms only requirment was my first car had to have airbags. Hence the 95-97 80 were the oldest ones I could look at. What a happy accident, thanks Mom.

I am now 23.... almost 24. I bought it with 191,000 and it now has 309,000. The 80 rocks. I think buying it a 14 was the best thing I could have done because I spent 1 year looking and working on it. I did all the 80 series maintenance items raved about on Mud.

Headgasket, cooling system with PHH, axle rebuild, etc. So by the time I was ready to drive, she was ready to go. I have driven it to Oregon 4 times (every summer), a seperate trip last summer up to British Columbia, a seperate trip down to Yosemite, and probably 10 trips to Moab, and countless trips to the San Juans from the front range in Colorado. The cruiser has never missed a beat and never left me stranded.

I did stupid stuff in highschool with it. Drove it up trails I shouldn't have, hit whoops that led to air time, drove through a river that should have taken out the motor. But the cruiser is so tolerant. It has been a trooper.

I was fortunate to have a nice garage to work on it in highschool where I could do all the tinkering that I cannot imagine having the time or dedicating the funds to do now. Since graduating highschool, the cruiser has been sitting outside getting minimal love and maximimum use. I have always had a beater car for the little around town trips. But, since moving to Aspen a little over a year ago, I drive the 80 everyday, and it takes the DD like a champ. I understand how some 80s get so neglected, they take a lot of abuse.

How many other cars can you buy at 14 and do all the stupid stuff one does at 14, put 37s on with no real upgrades and drive it for 50,000 miles? THEN at 255,000 miles, throw a supercharger on it, throw two sky boxes on it, and drive it to another country, THEN bring it home and drive it everyday? And oh ya, it still doesn't burn oil between changes.

Land Cruisers Rule.

First trip with permit
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Highschool grad trip en route to Oregon
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Moving me out of college
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Loaded up | Canada Bound
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And how she looks when she gets a wash
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