Offroad jacks... really?

DaveInDenver

Middle Income Semi-Redneck
The guys who I know with them (or the Harbor Freight knock off) love 'em for gravel driveways.

Something you want to bring along for a weekend camping on Forest Service roads? No, of course not. Not over the factory jack, cribbing and maybe a Hi-Lift. I could see a larger full-time camper with space and payload bringing one for the ability to do more involved maintenance. They are better than a bottle jack and easier to move around than a scissor jack. The hardcore guys like them, too. But their trade-off decision fishbone is different than mine.

Just because you don't have a need doesn't mean they don't scratch an itch for someone.
 

Ozarker

Well-known member

beef tits

Well-known member
As a jack it looks great for gravel.

To be clear I’m not knocking the jacks themselves, but more the trend and marketing angle of lugging them around on the back of a $3,000 swing-out bumper as if their usefulness actually justifies it.
 

beef tits

Well-known member
Forgive my ignorance as I've never used a Hi-Lift. But what makes them so dangerous? To me they look like a taller version of the countless bumper jacks I've used that came in a number of 60's and 70's cars that I've owned.

View attachment 831933
They can make a vehicle very tipsy if used improperly. I’d never put myself under an axle being supported by one.

That being said they have MANY more uses than a floor jack.


Hi Lift is a brand, they’re more widely known as ‘farm jacks’.
 

Ozarker

Well-known member
BTW, this reminds me, an engineer told me that hydraulic rams weren't that expensive, as he had some custom made for a project.

On higher dollar rigs, why not just build in a ram jack at the front and rear or at all four corners, (like some race cars) and forget about jack issues?

You could screw on bottom "feet" on a ram cylinder to give better footing for sand, mud, rock or whatever, screw on and off adapters.
 

rruff

Explorer
I know we are all gear dorks to some degree, but really? I've off-roaded a lot of places with a lot of 35" tires, had plenty of flats in precarious terrain... and I have never been in a situation where the factory bottle jack did not work.
The stock Tundra screw bottle jack has loads of travel and is light. I've lifted the whole front end with one. It might be a good idea to have two, but that should keep we well covered.

20211025_121459-jpg.653891
 
I'm planning on getting one. I have a 3rd Gen 4Runner with a typical ~3" lift. Bushings on the rear control arms were shot so I got after market control arms with Jonny-joints. Really increased the articulation. Problem is, my 48" Hi-Lift now won't lift a rear tire off the ground. Taco'd a rim in Baja so I had to find a way. Ended up lifting the other side and then strapping the axle as it was compressed. Then went over to the strapped side and I could now lift it off the ground to change. Not OSHA approved, but it worked. Think I'd be much better off with one of the so called off-road floor jacks.
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crazysccrmd

Observer
I'm planning on getting one. I have a 3rd Gen 4Runner with a typical ~3" lift. Bushings on the rear control arms were shot so I got after market control arms with Jonny-joints. Really increased the articulation. Problem is, my 48" Hi-Lift now won't lift a rear tire off the ground. Taco'd a rim in Baja so I had to find a way. Ended up lifting the other side and then strapping the axle as it was compressed. Then went over to the strapped side and I could now lift it off the ground to change. Not OSHA approved, but it worked. Think I'd be much better off with one of the so called off-road floor jacks.
View attachment 832038

I used to solve that by ratchet strapping the axle to the frame and then jacking the truck up. Works great as long as you don’t need the suspension drooped to fix something.
 

craig333

Expedition Leader
They can make a vehicle very tipsy if used improperly. I’d never put myself under an axle being supported by one.

That being said they have MANY more uses than a floor jack.


Hi Lift is a brand, they’re more widely known as ‘farm jacks’.
Maybe its regional but growing up around here no one referred to them as farm jacks.
 

DCH109

Adventurer
I never understood these jacks, they take up so much room. I use a bottle jack out of a Mercedes Sprinter van. More than enough height. For anything else I have a Hi-Lift strapped across the upper roll cage on my jeep (you cannot see it as I have a hard top). It is easily accessible and stays out of the elements.

I use to have one of those Harbor Freight Aluminum jack mounted to a aluminum slide (no wheels. It worked fine, but was to bulky. I cannot imagine that jack in the OP first post. It would take up so much space if inside.
 

SDDiver5

Expedition Leader
I like them and have seen them in use. The work great and apparently the quality is fantastic and warranty/customer service is top notch....which would be enough for me.

But I have no practical use for one other than thinking I look cool. I bring a large bottle jack and a 2 foot section of a very thick wooden beam I had left over when I build a carport at my old house and that worked fine the one time I had to use it.
 

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
I'm planning on getting one. I have a 3rd Gen 4Runner with a typical ~3" lift. Bushings on the rear control arms were shot so I got after market control arms with Jonny-joints. Really increased the articulation. Problem is, my 48" Hi-Lift now won't lift a rear tire off the ground. Taco'd a rim in Baja so I had to find a way. Ended up lifting the other side and then strapping the axle as it was compressed. Then went over to the strapped side and I could now lift it off the ground to change. Not OSHA approved, but it worked. Think I'd be much better off with one of the so called off-road floor jacks.
View attachment 832038
Get a 60 inch High Lift
 

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