Yetti's moto kit- small

Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
I recently took a month long motorcycle trip through Patagonia, Argentina and Chile. I was a extremely inexperienced rider. I always put some sort of medical kit together, this was for the trip.

A few meds, bandages, TQ, NPA, trauma sheers, bandaids, Ortho wrap, tape, antiseptic creams, sting relief, burn cream ( it has lidocaine in it) tape, gauze wrap, and a few 4x4, and 2x2's.
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I would Be happy to answer any questions, critiques, etc

Sent from somewhere remote on my BlackBerry
 
Last edited:

azken

Observer
That's about all I carry..enough to stop bleeding.. I also use Kling instead of tape..easier to use doesn't deteriorate and doesn't contribute to allergies. Also carry a Sam's Splint..easy to fold and cut with trauma shears. It all boils down to ABC's. BTW thanks for being this up.
 

shade

Well-known member
Leukotape P tape is excellent for covering blisters & hot spots, or for holding a dressing in place when sweat and rubbing will work it free. It's far better than moleskin, duct tape, or any of the other things I've tried. Once applied, it won't release for days.

If you remove some from a roll to take a smaller amount, it has to be lined with label backing waxed paper (or whatever that's formally called) to keep the adhesive from going bad.
 

jgaz

Adventurer
X2 on Leukotape, best tape I’ve found for feet.

I get away with wrapping a smaller amount around the larger plastic tube that Tylenol comes in. I can carry it this way for season before the adhesive loses too much grip. It’s not ideal but works for me.
Also, I use the scissors on my SAK because I’ve never had any luck tearing the tape.

I wish I could buy the stuff in a smaller roll then15 yards.
Anyone ever had any luck finding smaller rolls?
 

shade

Well-known member
X2 on Leukotape, best tape I’ve found for feet.

I get away with wrapping a smaller amount around the larger plastic tube that Tylenol comes in. I can carry it this way for season before the adhesive loses too much grip. It’s not ideal but works for me.
Also, I use the scissors on my SAK because I’ve never had any luck tearing the tape.

I wish I could buy the stuff in a smaller roll then15 yards.
Anyone ever had any luck finding smaller rolls?
Nope, just the big roll is all I've found. I use the tiny scissors on my tiny Victorinox knife.
 

Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
I almost always have a few rolls of CoFlex in there. ( I buggered up my ankle in Patagonia and took it out to wrap)

AKA vet wrap, cheaper tougher, and sticks to itself.
 

shade

Well-known member
I almost always have a few rolls of CoFlex in there. ( I buggered up my ankle in Patagonia and took it out to wrap)

AKA vet wrap, cheaper tougher, and sticks to itself.
CoFlex may work, but I don't think it would replicate the properties of Leukotape P. I've had it firmly attached to my feet for a week of hiking, and still had to soak it in a hot tub to remove it. The fabric is a very tight weave, thin & smooth, and the zinc oxide adhesive is something special that bonds to skin like nothing else I've experienced.
 

Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
I'll have to look into it, see if it's something I like.
I deal with a lot off Ortho stuff during my contracts.

Thanks

Sent from somewhere remote on my BlackBerry
 

shade

Well-known member
I was tasked with revising some first responder curriculum, and got crossways with a few people when I recommended dropping instruction on the use of airways and treating a pneumothorax because both were far outside the actual scope of training & certification. IMO, we either needed to train & equip people properly for those procedures, or spend that training time on topics that were truly appropriate.

I was told that I didn't understand how important NPAs etc. were, and that the training would remain because ... well, they never could explain the logic of their position. Something silly about how a first responder would tell an EMT how to do their job, like that made any sense.

I only lasted one meeting.
 
D

Deleted member 9101

Guest
I was tasked with revising some first responder curriculum, and got crossways with a few people when I recommended dropping instruction on the use of airways and treating a pneumothorax because both were far outside the actual scope of training & certification. IMO, we either needed to train & equip people properly for those procedures, or spend that training time on topics that were truly appropriate.

I was told that I didn't understand how important NPAs etc. were, and that the training would remain because ... well, they never could explain the logic of their position. Something silly about how a first responder would tell an EMT how to do their job, like that made any sense.

I only lasted one meeting.

The Army went through something similar when they took IVs away from CLS. People cried...and then realized that CLS were so focused on IVs that they were completely screwing up all kinds of other things, like hemorrhage control.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
While I agree, in 22 year as an EMT-P and I have yet to use one state side.

Fair enough and I respect and defer to your higher level of medical training. My experience and use of NPA's came from 20 years of SWAT TEM's/EMT in rural environments following tactical intervention or MVA's resulting in airway management with little or no assistance and prior to the arrival of EMS/ALS.
 
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shade

Well-known member
Fair enough and I respect and defer to your higher level of medical training. My experience and use of NPA's came from 20 years of SWAT TEM's/EMT in rural environments following tactical intervention or MVA's resulting in airway management with little or no assistance and prior to the arrival of EMS/ALS.
IMO, that's appropriate, as long as you're trained, as I'm sure you were. If I worked in an area where EMS wasn't close, or in a high risk field where getting the casualty & EMS together might be difficult, I'd want the same capability.

I wouldn't want my training time wasted on being able to identify the need for those more advanced procedures that I couldn't perform. At that meeting, I was told that the reason for the training was so the first responder would be able to identify a pneumothorax and relay that to EMS so "they'd know what to treat and speed up their response." I countered by saying their speed ought to be ASAP if a first responder identified a penetrating chest wound, or that the casualty couldn't breath.

At the level of that training, the first responders were lay people with very basic first aid capabilities. Instead of trying to diagnose, I felt it was more important to identify and describe in lay terms. Keeping it simple and easy to understand was more important than diagnosing; leave that to the pros in the medical field. I was saying that to a few EMTs in the meeting, but they weren't listening. They kept insisting I was wrong because treating those conditions was important - I never said they weren't, of course.

Weird group. I passed the assignment off to someone else and haven't heard more about it. My guess is they'll leave that training in the curriculum, and my suggestion about training when NOT to apply a tourniquet will also be ignored.

Back on topic: I like Maxpedition gear. :)
 

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